Photo of Patrick Driscoll

Patrick Driscoll is an Associate based in our Boston office. He brings practical experience to the firm’s IP practice, having worked as an electrical engineer for nearly a decade. Pat practices in all areas of IP law, with a focus on patent prosecution and litigation. His experience includes electrical and computer technologies such as RF, microwave, antenna, phased array, wireless communications, optical networking, telecommunications, signal processing, GPS, consumer electronics, electronic storage, software-based, aviation control, medical devices, lighting, clean energy, and consumer packaging technologies.

In a first of its kind decision with important ramifications for patentees, the U.S. International Trade Commission (“ITC”) denied a petition to suspend or temporarily rescind remedial orders issued in Investigation No. 337-TA-945 pending appeal of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board’s (“PTAB”) separate finding that the patent claims at issue are invalid.  The ITC has therefore decided to continue to exclude products it found to be infringing certain patents, regardless of the PTAB invalidating the very patents the exclusion order is based upon in separate IPR proceedings.  While this decision aiding patentees may surprise some, it is consistent with the ITC’s practices regarding stays and of giving little deference to IPR proceedings.

Continue Reading ITC Denies Suspension or Temporary Rescission of Remedial Orders After PTAB Invalidates Patents at Issue

The Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB”) issued Final Written Decisions regarding Cisco’s U.S. Patent Nos. 6,377,577 (the “’577 Patent”) and 7,023,853 (the “’853 Patent”) on May 25, 2017 and U.S. Patent No. 7,224,668 (the “’668 Patent”) on June 1, 2017.  The PTAB found the ’577 and ’668 Patents invalid but upheld the validity of the ’853 Patent.  The Inter Partes Review (“IPR”) proceedings were brought by Arista Networks in retaliation to Cisco’s accusations of infringement brought in multiple venues, including at the U.S. International Trade Commission (“ITC”), which had just a few weeks earlier upheld the validity of these very same patents and determined that Arista infringed the ’577 and ’668 Patents, and issued exclusion and cease and desist orders accordingly.  Since the IPR decisions issued Arista has filed a petition asking the ITC to suspend its limited exclusion order regarding the ’577 Patent based on the PTAB’s decision and is expected to file a similar request with respect to the ’668 Patent.  On the other side, Cisco plans to appeal the PTAB’s decisions to the Federal Circuit.  The uncertainty created by these inconsistent outcomes is an issue for patent owners, and it will be interesting to see how these cases are resolved.  In addition, this case shows that even though the ITC does not stay its investigations for IPRs, IPRs may still impact ITC proceedings.

Continue Reading PTAB Invalidates Two Cisco Patents Found Valid and Infringed at the ITC

america_338678930For just the third time ever, the Patent Trial and Appeals Board (“PTAB” or the “Board”) recently sided with a Patent Owner in an inter partes review (“IPR”) to find that evidence of secondary considerations of non-obviousness compelled rejection of the Petitioner’s invalidity challenges.  In doing so, the Board may have provided other patent owners with a roadmap for prevailing in IPRs with this rarely successful argument against obviousness.

World Bottling Cap had successfully petitioned the Board for inter partes review of Crown Packaging Technology’s U.S. Patent No. 8,550,271 on obviousness grounds.  The ’271 Patent describes a bottle cap made with thinner and harder steel compared to conventional caps.   Continue Reading PTAB Provides A Possible Roadmap For Patent Owners To Successfully Argue Secondary Considerations Of Nonobvious

As we have covered in detail here before, Apple sued Samsung in 2011, for infringement of design patents covering a black rectangular front face with rounded corners, a rectangular front face with rounded corners and a raised rim, and a grid of 16 colorful icons on a black screen.   A jury found that several Samsung smartphones did infringe those patents and awarded $399 million in damages to Apple for Samsung’s design patent infringement. The Federal Circuit subsequently upheld the award.

Last week, the Supreme Court held that the relevant “article of manufacture” for arriving at a damages award for design patent infringement need not be the end product sold to the consumer, but may be only a component of that product. In Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., et al. v. Apple Inc., 580 U.S. ___, No. 15-777, slip op. (Dec. 6, 2016), a unanimous 8-0 opinion authored by Justice Sotomayor reversed the Federal Circuit’s ruling that Apple was entitled to $399 million in damages, and remanded the case to the Federal Circuit.

To read more about the decision, please click here.

The Federal Circuit recently determined that it lacked jurisdiction to review the Patent Trial and Appeal Board’s determination that assignor estoppel has no affect in an inter partes review (“IPR”).  The majority’s decision in Husky Injection Molding Sys Ltd., v. Athena Automation Ltd., Nos. 2015-1726, 2015-1727 (Fed. Cir. Sep. 23, 2016) effectively allows former patent owners and inventors to use IPRs to challenge patents they have since assigned.

Continue Reading CAFC’s Husky Decision Makes Sledding Tougher for Patent Owners in PTAB Appeals

Think you’ve won on validity at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) and your claims are safe on appeal? “Not so fast,” says the Federal Circuit in Software Rights Archive, LLC v. Facebook Inc., Nos. 2015-1649 through 2015-1563 (Fed. Cir., Sep. 9, 2016) (nonprecedential) (per curiam).

In Software Rights, patentee Software Rights Archive appealed an Inter Partes Review (IPR) decision finding four independent claims across two patents invalid (two claims in each patent). Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter cross-appealed, arguing that further claims should not have been held patentable.

The Federal Circuit panel majority, performing its own analysis of the prior art, agreed with Facebook that several additional claims in the patents were anticipated and rendered obvious over the cited prior art.

Continue Reading Federal Circuit: Go whole-hog on validity below if you want to contest an independent determination of invalidity on appeal

Patent Agent PrivilegeOn March 7, 2016, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit recognized “a patent-agent privilege extending to communications with non-attorney patent agents when those agents are acting within the agent’s authorized practice of law before the Patent Office.”  The opinion, In Re: Queen’s University at Kingston, PARTEQ Research and Development Innovations, authored by Judge O’Malley and joined by Judge Lourie, granted Queen’s University’s petition for mandamus relief and ordered the district court to withdraw its blanket order compelling the production of communications between Queen’s University and its non-attorney patent agents.

Queen’s University, located in Ontario, Canada, sued Samsung for patent infringement.  Throughout fact discovery, Queen’s University refused to produce certain documents it believed contained privileged information.  The documents included communications between Queen’s University employees and registered non-lawyer patent agents, which were working without attorney supervision, discussing the prosecution of the patents-in-suit.  Samsung moved the district court to compel the production of these documents.  The magistrate judge granted Samsung’s motion, finding that the agents’ communications are not subject to the attorney client privilege and that a separate patent-agent privilege does not exist.

Continue Reading The Federal Circuit Newly Recognizes Patent-Agent Privilege

Fed-Circuit-300x99In Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. v. Covidien LP, a 2-1 panel split of the Federal Circuit held that neither the American Invents Act (“AIA”) nor the Constitution precludes the same panel of the Patent Trial & Appeal Board (“PTAB” or “Board”) from both deciding whether to institute an inter partes review (“IPR”) of a challenged U.S. Patent and making the final patentability determination in that IPR.

Under the AIA, an IPR validity challenge can hinge on two major determinations: whether to institute a requested IPR trial, and, if the IPR is instituted, whether the challenged claims were proven unpatentable during that IPR trial. Under the United States Patent and Trademark Office’s (“PTO”) current implementation of the AIA, both of these determinations are typically made by the same Board panel of three Administrative Law Judges.

Consistent with that implementation, when Covidien petitioned the PTO for inter partes review of Ethicon patent claims, the same Board panel decided to institute the IPR and then issued a final written decision finding the challenged Ethicon patent claims unpatentable.

Continue Reading USPTO Implementation of AIA Does Not Violate Due Process: Federal Circuit Affirms the PTAB Panel Determining Institution of an IPR can also Issue the Final Written Decision

Smartphone Wars

On Monday, in the latest episode of the smartphone wars, Samsung filed a petition for certiorari with the Supreme Court. Samsung is appealing a Federal Circuit decision that upheld a $399 million judgment against Samsung for infringing three of Apple’s design patents. Samsung argues that the decision, if left unchecked by the Supreme Court, could dramatically increase the value of design patents. While the Supreme Court is the ultimate power in patent jurisprudence, it was a long time ago that it last considered a design patent case; more than 120 years ago according to Samsung. Samsung’s petition presents two fundamental questions concerning design patents:

1. Where a design patent includes unprotected non-ornamental features, should a district court be required to limit that patent to its protected ornamental scope?

2. Where a design patent is applied to only a component of a product, should an award of infringer’s profits be limited to those profits attributable to the component? Continue Reading Smartphone Wars – The Supreme Court Awakens: Samsung Files Petition for Certiorari in New Hope to Harmonize Design Patent Law

Yesterday the Federal Circuit ruled in MCM Portfolio LLC v. Hewlett-Packard Company (here) that vesting the Patent Office with power to take back previously-conferred patent rights through inter partes review does not violate Article III or the Seventh Amendment. According to Judge Dyk:

“Congress created the PTO … and saw powerful reasons to utilize [its] expertise … for an important public purpose—to correct the agency’s own errors in issuing patents in the first place. Reacting to ‘a growing sense that questionable patents are too easily obtained and are too difficult to challenge,’ Congress sought to ‘provide a more efficient system for challenging patents that should not have been issued’ and to ‘establish a more efficient and streamlined patent system that will improve patent quality and limit unnecessary and counterproductive litigation costs.’… It would be odd indeed if Congress could not authorize the PTO to reconsider its own decisions.”

Continue Reading Federal Circuit Deems IPR Constitutional: The Patent Office Can Correct Its Own Mistakes