This post is the second in a series of weekly blog posts covering legal issues for consideration during the early stages of development of a health app and providing best practices to help guide you through a successful launch. Consideration of intellectual property (IP) protection early in the development of a health app is important.  Otherwise you could lose the opportunity to do so in the future or be forced to change the name or other details of your app after you have already invested time and money in the app.

Trademark

Does your health app have a name? A logo? A tagline or slogan? Will it be marketed anywhere? If the answer to any of these questions is “yes,” you should think about applying for trademark protection.  Words, names, slogans, sounds, symbols, and more can be protected by trademark if used to indicate a source of the goods/services (i.e., the health app) and to identify and distinguish the health app from those offered or sold by others.

To read the rest of the post on our Health Law & Policy Matters blog, please click here.

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This past Thursday the Brexit vote sent shockwaves around world, including the IP community and in particular with respect to IP rights in the UK and Europe. But concerns at the moment are speculative as nothing yet has changed.

The UK has only voted on whether to leave the EU. The UK has not actually left the EU, nor is any such departure likely for at least two years from the date the UK officially notifies the EU of its plan to withdraw. Modifications to any IP laws will come only through terms of the Brexit negotiated between the UK and the EU in the coming months and years.

In the meantime, we can predict and highlight potential impacts that could result from a UK exit from the European Union.

Continue Reading Keep Calm and IP On: Planning for UK IP Post-Brexit

George Bailey stands on a bridge begging for another chance at life. Upon being granted a second chance, he joyously runs home to embrace his family. As the community of Bedford Falls rallies around him and raises funds to save the endangered Building and Loan and George Bailey personally from an unjustified failure, someone proclaims a toast to George Bailey, “the richest man in town.” It’s a powerful ending to a beloved holiday classic, and it would have been forgotten over time but for accidentally allowing a copyright to expire.

Continue Reading When a Quirk of Copyright Law Creates a Christmas Classic: It’s a Wonderful Life and the Public Domain

Senator Patrick Leahy has introduced a bill (Senate bill 23) that aims to address the transfer of a copyright to the author’s spouse or next of kin following the author’s death. There is also a corresponding bill (H.R. 238) in the House, introduced by Representative Derek Kilmer.

For more information about these bills and the status of any action on them, please see the extended post on our Copyright and Trademark Matters blog.