Following a lengthy and extensive litigation that began in 2011 that culminated in a U.S. Supreme Court decision in December of 2016, smartphone industry titans Apple and Samsung will again find themselves in Federal District Court Judge Lucy Koh’s courtroom on remand to determine appropriate damages for Samsung’s infringement of Apple’s design patents.

Design Patent No. 593087

US Design Pat. No. 593,087

US Design Pat. No. 604,305

Design Patent No. 618677

US Design Pat. No. 618,677

As we have written before, Apple originally filed this patent infringement action in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California in 2011, alleging that, in relevant part, Samsung’s smartphones infringed three of Apple’s design patents. Judge Koh presided over the dispute. The jury found infringement of all three design patents, and the district court entered final judgment awarding $399 million attributable to Samsung’s infringement of the design patents. The Federal Circuit upheld the lower court’s judgment on the amount of damages for infringement of the design patents, and Samsung filed a petition for certiorari to the Supreme Court seeking reversal.

Continue Reading Apple and Samsung Are Headed Back to the Court Room

On February 25, 2016, Judge Richard Andrews granted the parties’ cross-motions to exclude both sides’ damages experts in M2M Solutions LLC v. Motorola Solutions, Inc., C.A. No. 12-33-RGMoneyA,
Dkt. Nos. 295 and 296 (D. Del. Feb. 25, 2016), and in doing so provided a salient reminder to all practitioners of the risks in presenting damages testimony uninformed by technical expertise.  In the case, plaintiff M2M Solutions LLC’s (“M2M”) expert Herman “Whitey” Bluestein – admittedly not a technical expert – improperly supplied an otherwise-absent link between demand for technology gauged in surveys and the technology at issue.  Defendant Telit Communications PLC (“Telit”) similarly proffered damages opinions lacking needed technical support.  Telit’s expert Charles Donohoe opined that worldwide portfolio licenses on FRAND terms that did not include the patent-in-suit represented the upper bound of a reasonable royalty rate for the asserted patent.  Concluding that Telit failed to adduce evidence that these portfolio licenses were relevant, the Court excluded Mr. Donohoe’s opinion.

Continue Reading In Daubert Ruling Excluding Both Parties’ Damages Experts, Judge Andrews Rejects FRAND Portfolio Rate as Ceiling on Reasonable Royalty, and Finds Use of Surveys Not Properly Tied to Relevant Technology